Thor Heyerdahl and the Kon-Tiki
Thor Heyerdahl and the Kon-Tiki
Thor Heyerdahl, the great Norwegian explorer and anthropologist, was born a hundred years ago, on October 6 1914, Heyerdahl became famous worldwide in 1947 when he completed the voyage of the "Kon-Tiki" raft about 20 yards that he had built for demonstrate the possibility that in ancient times it had been inhabited by Polynesian peoples from Peru and from the land of the Incas, rather than - still prevailing assumptions - from immigration arrived from Asia. The "Kon-Tiki", reconstructed by mimicking the capabilities and availability of pre-Columbian peoples, was made of balsa logs and set out with Thor Heyerdahl and five other people on board (four Norwegians and a Swede) April 28, 1947 from Callao, in Peru. 101 days after they arrived in the archipelago of Tuamotu in French Polynesia. 
Heyerdahl worked to support his hypothesis for most of his life, and the success of the voyage of the Kon-Tiki - which took its name from a legend that divinity recovery from Heyerdahl wanted to have inspired the migration of South America - was crucial to give attention at the community scientific, despite the belief of scholars that remains of colonization from the West, and although many have mocked and attacked the reconstruction of Heyerdahl. But the trip was also a story of great popular reputation - and this according to the same Heyerdahl really sapped of its scientific credibility - and they were a book, a documentary and a film featuring a great success as well as the construction of a museum in Oslo which houses the original raft.

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