Henri de Toulouse Lautrec, 150 years after his birth
the work of French artist Henri de Toulouse Lautrec, who portrayed the bohemian Paris of the late nineteenth century, is celebrated by Google doodle that mixes with one of his famous works with what would be his portrait, 150 years after his birth.

The artist, whose life of excesses fed one of the biggest myths in the history of art, was an opponent of the Impressionist art movement, and focused on capture in his works the night of Paris cafes, theaters, cabarets, brothels and prostituas were the inspiration for his work.

The post-impressionist suffered a congenital disease that affected the development of their bones and prevented grow over a meter and a half, which kept him with multiple health problems throughout his life.

However, his genius and vision led him to be recognized in the Parisian cultural sphere, through his illustrations for magazines and billboards, mostly responsible for promoting the shows of different cabarets.

After a lifetime of heavy drinking, added to his health problems, Toulouse Lautrec suffered depressive and psychotic manic episodes, which led him to be admitted to a mental hospital, but that did not stop to continue painting: there he made a collection of paintings about circus.

The artist was allowed to live with his mother near the city of Bordeaux, where he was to death on September 9, 1901, lying on his bed.

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