In Australia: found traces of the most powerful fall of the asteroid on Earth

In Australia: found traces of the most powerful fall of the asteroid on Earth
    In Australia, found traces of the most powerful fall of the asteroid on Earth
    Geologists found traces of a giant asteroid with a diameter of 30 kilometers in western Australia, which led to a series of 11-point earthquakes, a tsunami several hundred meters high and large-scale destruction approximately 3.46 billion years ago.

    Geologists found traces of a giant asteroid with a diameter of 30 kilometers in western Australia, which led to a series of 11-point earthquakes, a tsunami several hundred meters high and large-scale destruction approximately 3.46 billion years ago, according to

    "This fall caused a series of earthquakes, whose strength exceeded the powerful tremors by an order of magnitude today, and it caused the most powerful tsunamis to crush the coastal cliffs. Rocks thrown into the air after this fall should have spread throughout the Earth," said Andrew Glikson (Andrew Glikson) from the National University of Australia in Canberra.

    Approximately 3.8-3.5 billion years ago, the Earth and the Moon survived an intense “bombardment” by large asteroids and comets that inhabited the inner part of the Solar System at that time. This bombardment, as planetologists believe today, brought to Earth gold, water, and those "bricks of life" from which our ancestors later formed.
    In Australia: found traces of the most powerful fall of the asteroid on Earth

    Glikson and his colleagues, geologists, apparently found traces of one of the last similar falls, which with a reserve claim to be the most serious fall of the asteroid on Earth in the entire history of its existence, studying the sediments of ancient sedimentary rocks that arose in deep antiquity, about 3 , 5-3,7 billion years ago, almost immediately after the Earth cooled down and the oceans and the first pieces of land appeared on it.

    According to Glikson, in the rocks of the Duffer formation, occurring in western Australia, his team found many microscopic balls with a diameter of one to two millimeters, the so-called spherules. Spherules, as scientists explain, are droplets of frozen rocks that have been melted and thrown into the air during the "landing" of comets and asteroids on the surface of the Earth.

    Spherules are interesting to scientists because their chemical composition and the proportions of isotopes inside their rocks can tell us about how they originated, what size their body produced, and even reveal the mystery of where and when this cataclysm occurred. For example, the larger the diameter of the spherules, the larger the asteroid that produced them must be.

    The study of the spherules from the Duffer formation revealed an amazing picture - it turned out that about 3.46 billion years ago an asteroid fell on Earth, whose diameter ranged from 30 to 40 kilometers. Thus, we can say that not an asteroid, but a small moon fell on our planet - its dimensions were approximately two to three times larger than that of Deimos, the smaller moon of Mars.

    This fall, in addition to tsunamis and earthquakes, could also split the Earth's crust and cause large-scale changes in it. As Glikson and his colleagues carefully suggest, this fall could have triggered the movement of tectonic plates. Unfortunately, it is hardly possible to find the location of the fall of this asteroid — in the intervening time, the crater left by it, whose diameter was to be several hundred kilometers, was to be destroyed as a result of tectonic plate movement, subduction of rocks and other geological processes.

    While scientists do not know whether it is possible to find traces of this fall in the history of the development of life on Earth. As Glikson and his colleagues believe, further excavation and refinement of the dating will help them understand how this fall could have affected the first living organisms on Earth and what other consequences it could cause.
    Wael Elyamani
    @Posted by
    writer and blogger, founder of CTV Egypt News .

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