Iran transmits images of a plane crashed

Iran transmits images of a plane crashed
    Iran transmits images of a plane crashed
    The aircraft of Aseman Airlines crashed on Sunday in the middle of a dense fog. All the people aboard flight EP3704 died, including 59 passengers and six crew members

    The rescue teams on Tuesday offered the first images of the place in the south of Iran where an airplane crashed, killing all 65 people on board, while they hoped to find the "black box" to discover the cause.

    Iranian state television broadcast images of the site, the side of a mountain in the vicinity of Yasuj, about 780 kilometers (485 miles) south of Tehran from where the Aseman Airlines aircraft had taken off on Sunday.

    The pilot of a helicopter, when interviewed by state television, said that the place is only about 30 meters (100 feet) from the peak of Mount Dwena, in the Zagros mountain range.

    "I saw pieces of the plane with the emblem of the airline Aseman," said the helicopter pilot, identified only as Captain Soheili.

    Authorities expect the rescue bodies to reach the black boxes on Tuesday. Those boxes, which in fact carry a bright color so that they can be easily found in the event of a crash, record communications between the cabin and the controllers, as well as other flight data.

    "If the conditions are met, we will take the black boxes out of the plane today and deliver them to Aseman Airlines," said Masud As'adi Samani, secretary general of the Civil Aviation Association of Iran, according to the ILNA agency.

    The accident site is too rugged to allow helicopters to land, forcing rescuers to jump in mid-flight, according to images broadcast on state television. The site is at an altitude of 3,500 meters (11,500 feet).

    Army General Kiumars Heidari said commandos will have to go there in special vehicles to be able to extract the dead, according to the Fars news agency.

    The Iranian Revolutionary Guard disclosed a photograph of the place captured by one of its drones, showing corpses in the snow.

    The device was an ATR-72 of the Aseman Airlines, a twin-engine turboprop powered craft used for short flights. It crashed on Sunday in a dense fog. All the people aboard flight EP3704 died, including 59 passengers and six crew members.

    Aseman Airlines, owned by Iran's pension foundation, is a semi-private company based in Tehran and Iran's third largest airline, behind Iran Air and Mahan Air. Its specialty is flights to remote areas of the country, but it also has some international routes, although it is banned by the European Union because it considers that it does not comply with the necessary security measures.
    Wael Elyamani
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    writer and blogger, founder of CTV Egypt News .

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